Absence seizure

1 May 2018
Comments: 0
1 May 2018, Comments: 0

An absence seizure is defined as brief, abrupt lapses of consciousness that is common among children than adults.

An individual with an absence seizure might appear to stare blankly into space for a few seconds. This is followed by rapid return to the usual degree of alertness. Take note that this form of seizure does not lead to any form of physical damage.

The seizure is generally managed with anti-seizure medications. Most children outgrow the seizure upon reaching the teenage years.

What are the indications?

Absence seizure

This seizure is characterized by a blank stare that is mistaken as an attention lapse lasting for 10 seconds but can last for up to 20 seconds without confusion, drowsiness or headache after.

This seizure is characterized by a blank stare that is mistaken as an attention lapse lasting for 10 seconds but can last for up to 20 seconds without confusion, drowsiness or headache after.

Other indications of an absence seizure include:

  • Lip smacking
  • Abrupt stop in motion without falling
  • Finger rubbing
  • Eyelid fluttering
  • Chewing motions
  • Small movements in both hands

After an episode, the individual could not recall the incident. Some experience several episodes daily that can disrupt with daily activities.

A child might experience the seizure for some time before an adult notice one since an episode is brief. The decline in the learning ability of the child is the initial sign of the condition. The child is often caught daydreaming or has difficulty paying attention.

Management of an absence seizure

The doctor will start with a low dose of anti-seizure medication and possibly increase as needed to control the seizures.

The drugs that are generally prescribed include:

  • Valproic acid
  • Ethosuximide
  • Lamotrigine

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