Detached retina

27 March 2017
Comments: 0
27 March 2017, Comments: 0

A detached retina occurs if the lining at the rear of the eye tugs away from the blood vessels at the rear part of the eye. The condition is likely to lead to blindness which is why immediate treatment is vital.

Indications of a detached retina

  • Appearance of floaters in the vision which are dark spots that drift or float in front of the eye.
  • Blurred vision
  • Flashes of light in the eye or a shadow across the field of vision

    Detached retina

    A detached retina is typically brought about by direct eye trauma or injuries from any blunt object.

What are the causes?

A detached retina is typically brought about by direct eye trauma or injuries from any blunt object. Remember that it is a common injury among boxers. In addition, aging is also a contributing factor for a detached retina since it starts to thin out and weaken.

Small holes form within the retina which enable fluid to seep through. The accumulation of fluid causes the retina to tug away from the rear part of the eye where its blood supply is. Due to the reduced supply of blood, the cells of the retina start to die.

Management of a detached retina

If an individual is suspected with a detached retina, an eye specialist must be seen. Observation of the eye is done using an ophthalmoscope to check the retina at the rear part of the eye.

In some cases, an ultrasound scan might also be carried out for further assessment. Surgery might be needed to reattach the retina. In most instances, this is effectively done and might only require an overnight stay in the hospital.

Quick Note / Disclaimer

The material posted on this page on a detached retina is for learning and educational purposes only. To learn to recognize and manage eye injuries, register for a first aid and CPR course with Toronto First Aid.

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