Urinary tract infection in children

2 February 2018
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2 February 2018, Comments: 0

A urinary tract infection occurs if bacteria enters the urinary system or tract. It is important to note that the urinary tract is responsible for producing urine and eliminating it out of the body.

The microorganisms that thrive in the large intestine and in the stool, can enter via the urethra. This is the tube that conveys urine from the bladder to be eliminated from the body. Once bacteria move into the urethra, it can pass into the bladder and kidneys.

Is it serious among children?

A urinary tract infection among children typically settles if medical treatment is started right away. In case the child continues to experience infections, further assessment is required to rule out other serious issues.

The infections can result to a serious infection known as sepsis. Issues from a urinary tract infection are likely to occur among infants born early, newborns and those who have something blocking the urine flow.

What are the signs?

Urinary tract infection

Infants and young children might not experience the usual symptoms such as discomfort or burning sensation during urination.

Infants and young children might not experience the usual symptoms such as discomfort or burning sensation during urination. In addition, they could not tell what they feel.

Among infants and young children, monitor for the following:

  • Strange-smelling urine
  • Fever
  • Vomiting
  • Fussiness
  • Poor appetite

As for older children, they might have the common signs such as:

  • Increased urge to urinate
  • Pain or burning sensation while urinating
  • Loss of bladder control
  • Reddish, pinkish, cloudy or foul-smelling urine
  • Flank pain that can be felt beneath the rib cage and above the waist on one or both sides of the back
  • Low abdominal pain

Management of urinary tract infection

The treatment for children involves antibiotics in which the prescribed course instructed by the doctor must be followed.

The child should be provided with extra fluids to drink. Older children must go to the bathroom often and empty their bladder.

A doctor should be consulted if the child does not feel better after 2 days in which medications were started.

A urinary tract infection must be treated right away to prevent other serious complications from developing. In some cases, infants younger than 3 months might require hospitalization for a while to receive intravenous medications.

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